Margate Kite Festival

Kite mosaic

We took a trip down to Margate yesterday, to the kite festival.  Last year we got there at about 3.00pm only to find an empty beach and not a kite in sight.  The weather was awful, strong winds  – which, ok, could have been an advantage – but there was also a lot of rain, and it was freezingly cold.  It seemed they’d all gone home early and I can’t say we blamed them.

But yesterday was wonderful.  A balmy breeze, strong enough to be good for kites but not so strong it was annoying, blue skies with enough cloud to be interesting, and warm sun.  The star of the show was a huge octopus kite.  We walked along the beach to get to the arena, so we saw it first from the back and it looked as if some war-of-the-worlds-style alien creature was about to take over Margate.

Alien attack

From the front, and a little deflated, it looked a lot less threatening:

Deflated octopus

Kites over Margate 2

Octopus 2

We had just missed a giant gecko, but there was a parrot:

Parrot

I think my favourite was this little red horse.  Although it does look cute in the photo, you need to see it in motion to get the full effect as the movement of the wind made it look as if it was realistically galloping along.  Sometimes I really wish my camera did video.

Red horse

But if monkeys are more your thing, you could have had this one – and a banana.  (And they were trying to inflate a giant lobster as we left.)

Banana

Some of the fancier ones never made it off the ground.  This one looked fantastic, but floundered around getting nowhere.

Kite

Sometimes, though, simpler can be better and there was something very fresh and appealing about this plain white kite against the blue of the sky.

White kite

The next one wasn’t flown while we were there, but it looks amazing just sitting on the ground.  It was huge and the colours were utterly gorgeous.

Red kite

Red kite abstract

Desperately seeking macro magic

Abalone shell 1

I’m still playing with macro.  I’ve sometimes found myself getting a little impatient with all the flower macros I see around: “can’t they think of anything else to photograph?” I say, all self-righteously.  But actually, I’m finding it quite hard myself to come up with much that isn’t flower or plant based.  There are lots of other things around, but it’s often a little tricky to make an interesting photo of them, and flowers always look so good. It is the popular option, but there’s a reason for that.

This has become my new mission at the moment: to find some macro subjects that are a little different.  I’m not sure this abalone shell is different enough, but it does have wonderful colours.  I have a better one than the one at the top, but I’m saving it for a Mortal Muse post.  What I like about this next one is that a face appeared in it that I didn’t know was there when I took it.  Can you see it?

Abalone face

What I don’t like with these shell photos is the lensbaby effect.  I feel they’d look better without the edge blurring, but the lensbaby is all I’ve got to do this with, so I just have to go with it.  It was also really difficult to find a decent composition – well, any kind of composition really – in among all the whorls and curves; I deleted loads that just didn’t look interesting at all.

Christmas pig

This is my Christmas pig; he fell out of a cracker when I was having a Christmas meal with some friends many years ago and I really liked him.  I don’t often keep the gifts from crackers, but he made me smile and for a long time I kept him on the  bedside table next to my alarm clock.  He’s very tiny – only about an inch in height (or 2.5cm if you like – I’m a late adopter when it comes to metric).  I think he makes quite a good macro subject, as well as being very cute, and I think the lensbaby effect works quite well here.

I’m not sure what to try next.  I’ve done feathers before – they’re always good – and leaves, and seedpods, and even chocolate brownies, but I’m struggling a bit to come up with some new ideas.  I was quite taken with this photo in the Mortal Muses flickr pool, of a close-up of some bedsprings.  Who would have thought you could make a decent photo out of that?  But then, I think you can make a decent photo out of anything if you can open your eyes enough to see the possibilities.

 

Apple Harvest

Apple Harvest

“Every thought is a seed.  If you plant crab apples, don’t count on harvesting Golden Delicious.”

Not sure who said this, but I think I need the reminder right now!  I loved the light on these fallen apples; made me think of the rich colours of an old master painting.

Sunday in Ballymena

Moravian graveyard 7

It’s been a very intense sort of week this last week.  A visit to Northern Ireland, a family funeral, then home and a therapy treatment that made me detox so much it felt like the worst hangover I’ve ever had, multiplied by five, and lasting three days.  It hasn’t made for regular blog entries, that’s for sure.

While we were in Northern Ireland we visited a village called Gracehill, near Ballymena (it’s one of the very few things to do in Ballymena, on a Sunday).  It was founded by a religious community of Moravians and there’s an old graveyard there that dates back to the mid-1700s.  If you imagine what might once have been a small field, long and thin, with a thick hedge around it and a tree-lined path down the centre, then you’ll have an idea what it was like.  The Moravians had a very strict social structure which they extended even to their dead, and all the men are buried on one side and the women on the other, and all the stones are the same size and shape to reflect their belief in everyone being of equal importance.

The graves are arranged in chronological order, with the oldest ones being near the entrance and the latest ones at the far end.  Further down, they spread over the whole area, but the older stones are all together and line each side of the path.  The story is that the gardener got fed up trying to mow between all the stones and so he placed them all together to make it easier for himself – true? I’m not sure.  Most of them are covered in moss and indecipherable, but the occasional one is clear – presumably someone must have cleared the moss off for some reason.

Moravian graveyard 1

Moravian graveyard 3

Moravian graveyard 2

Moravian graveyard 6

Moravian graveyard 5

Faux roses

The weather was poor when we were there, with flat, dull light and intermittent drizzle, but I think that maybe it suits the subject matter.  It was a very peaceful, calm place, with a tinge of melancholy to it as well.  I’ve always liked cemeteries – I like to ponder about who these people were, and wonder about why this one died at the age of 23, and what sort of character that one turned into, having lived to 87.  I like looking at the names, to see how names have changed in popularity over the years.  And there are always small and interesting things to puzzle over, like who left this bunch of faded artificial roses for a loved one and why they never replaced them with a fresher bunch .

Wildflower macro

Cow parsley 1

I saw this perfect bloom in a wildflower meadow and brought it home with me to photograph.  I’m not sure what it’s called, but I love the little circle of fronds at the base of the flower and the umbrella shape of the flower itself.  Somewhere I have a book on wild flowers and must find it and check out what this one is.

It’s a while since I’ve done any macro shooting, but we’re going to be musing on macro soon over at Mortal Muses and I thought I’d better get some practice in.  All I have to do it with is my Lensbaby with macro attachment – oh for a proper macro lens!  But this does a pretty good job.  The one at the top is my favourite, but here’s a couple of others.  I’m not sure the first one quite works; something about the composition isn’t right although I can’t put my finger on it at the moment.  And I feel the second is too dark, and the focus isn’t in the right place, although I’m happier with how it’s composed.

Cow parsley 2

Cow parsley 3

I thought I’d try a different version of the one at the top of this post, making it much softer.  I like them both, but think I probably prefer the sharper option.  It always fascinates me how you can take the same photo and make it completely different just by doing a bit of creative editing.

Cow parsley 4

Given my loathing of tripods, I rarely use one when doing this sort of thing but it does make it tricky.  Something I discovered that works well for me is to rock gently back and forth while looking through the viewfinder.  Just as I see the subject coming into focus, I press the shutter and take the photo.  If you’re shooting outdoors this can actually work better than using a tripod, as the flowers move in the breeze anyway.

Absence

Geoff

Geoff’s been in Northern Ireland for nearly a week.  His mum’s very ill and not expected to live much longer.  I feel for him.  It’s hard, watching someone you love fade away, not able to do much but hold their hand and hope they feel your love.  He has to be there, he has to stay for as long as it takes, and I wouldn’t have it any other way.  And at first it was fine – a bit of a change, no cooking to do, free to structure my day however I want – but now, well, now – I miss him, and I really want him home again.  Feeling lonely tonight.

“Absence diminishes small loves and increases great ones, as the wind blows out the candle and blows up the bonfire.”

Francois de la Rouchefoucauld

On a funnier note (because you can’t keep me down for long):  one of my cats is sound asleep, curled up and lying right on top of the phone.  If it rings she’s going to get such a shock.

Rainy days are great for photography – honest!

Las Iguanas

I’m always telling the people who come on my workshops that rain offers wonderful opportunities for great photos, but what I do when it rains?  I stay in, of course.  Well, you know – it’s wet out there.

But sometimes you get caught in it without meaning to, and last week was one of those times.  My friend Eileen and I had gone to see the Tracy Emin exhibition at the South Bank Centre in London.  I still don’t know what I think about Ms Emin so maybe I’ll come back to that bit of it later.  Anyway, the South Bank Centre is celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Festival of Britain at the moment, and there are artworks of various kinds all around the area.  Before we went in, when it was still dry – just – we explored a few of these.

One of them is the Urban Fox, a giant structure made out of straw applied to a wooden framework.  He’s rather good, isn’t he?

Urban Fox

And this is a photo of a photo of him being transported there.  You can see just how big he is – look at the size of his head compared to the size of the truck transporting him.

Urban Fox transporter

There was also this themed, outdoor, cafe sort of place; not sure what it was meant to be about, but the colours were wonderful.

Indian cafeFlowers and stripes

 

Dishoom

I also loved the bright pink of this Banksy-style mural, especially in among the rather nasty grey concrete that dominates this area.

Pink

As we came out, we headed for an amazing rooftop garden (of which more in another post).  We started exploring, but the clouds had darkened and the rain began to come down in huge, fat drops, so we headed for cover.  Beneath us as we came down the steps there was a fountain installation by Jeppe Hein called Appearing Rooms.  Jets of water create ‘rooms’ inside the fountain, and these rooms keep changing.  A group of teenagers had stripped off and were having huge fun trying to predict where the next ‘room’ would appear.

Appearing Rooms

They left shortly after we reached shelter but this little boy wandered up, looked at the fountain for a moment, and then jumped right into it fully clothed.  A few minutes later his mother appeared, looking absolutely horrified.  There are times when I wish I wasn’t so old and sensible; part of me was wanting to run right into it myself and dance in the centre.

Fountain dancer

I also took this shot, looking up through the fountain towards the steps we had just come down.  The couple with the umbrella appeared at the top of the steps and I suddenly saw what a great shot it would make, taken through the water jets.  I zoomed right in and grabbed the shot – they only stayed there for a moment – not knowing if it would work, but it did!

Umbrella

The rain was torrential, with some thunder and lightning.  I liked this guy’s solution to staying dry.

Orange cape

Chairs in the rain

Central Bar

Green reflection

And I’m going to include this shot (because I like it), even though I got it badly wrong and the shoes are very out of focus – I’m so annoyed with myself.

Shoes

Finally, some tips that might be helpful if you fancy trying some photography in the rain.

  • Sounds obvious, but unless your camera has weather-sealing, keep it as dry as possible. Light rain probably won’t harm it for a short while, but it should definitely be protected against heavy rain. Hold an umbrella over it; pop it inside a ziplock plastic bag (with hole cut out for lens); buy a pack of Rainsleeves (very cheap); or splash out on a well-designed rain cover. At the very least, tuck it inside your jacket while you’re not using it.
  • Two more cheap ways of keeping your camera dry: use one of those clear plastic shower caps you get in hotel rooms – place the elasticated end over the lens. Or use an old waterproof jacket or trousers (try charity shops) and cut off an arm or a leg. These are often elasticated, which helps fit the end round your lens.
  • Don’t ignore the obvious: find a doorway or tree to shelter under while you shoot.
  • Wipe your camera – lens, LCD screen, camera body – down frequently with a microfibre cloth.
  • To keep your lens as dry as possible, keep the lens cap on until you’re ready to shoot. Have some soft lint-free cloths available to wipe your lens with.
  • Using a lens hood will also help keep the raindrops off.
  • Here’s another idea: put your camera on a monopod and use a superclamp to fix an umbrella to it. It’s portable and because the camera isn’t inside anything it makes it easier to operate.
  • Keep your camera pointed down when you’re not using it to keep most of the raindrops off the lens.
  • Keep yourself dry too. Good waterproofs will have you singing in the rain.
  • If you’ve been out in the cold and are coming back into the warm, avoid condensation forming on your camera by placing it inside a sealable plastic bag (while you’re still outside) and squashing out most of the air. Then let it come back to room temperature. Humidity generally isn’t good for your camera if it persists for a long time. Make sure that it spends most of its time in a warm, light, dry place to discourage moulds and other nasties.
  • If the worst does happen and your camera gets a dowsing, there’s a great article on Shutterbug telling you what you need to do.  Print out a copy of it and keep it inside your camera bag. Use waterproof ink, of course 🙂

 

Sky

I have written before, in many and various places, how confined I feel living where I do.  My home is dark, partly because it just is, and partly because there are so many houses here, efficiently stashed together into terraces to take up minimal space,  and between the houses are mean, narrow little streets where the light struggles to make its way in.  A small slice of sky is all there is.

Often I long for sky, wide open expanses of it.  When I drive to Thanet, where the land is flat and the sky goes on forever, my heart begins to lift and flutter, my breathing slows, and something in me unwinds.  And I don’t even like the place that much – it just has a lot of sky.

Where I grew up, in Scotland, we have a lot more space than we do here in south-east England and a lot of it’s pretty empty if you don’t count the sheep.  I lived in a highly populated part of it but I spent a lot of time in the mountains and on the moors and coasts, feeling as if it was just me and the sky and endless, wonderful space.  I’ve never regretted leaving Scotland, but I do miss that sky.

The sky is this planet’s negative space – mostly empty, isn’t used for much in itself, but absolutely essential to make everything else feel right.

Linking to Mortal Muses, on negative space.

 

Uncertainty

Umbrella abstract

This photo of a couple with an umbrella was taken through a fountain – the abstract, painterly result was an unexpected, and welcome, surprise.

Uncertainty is the name of the game right now. We’ve had seven months of being uncertain whether or not Geoff would be made redundant, and now that he has there’s even more uncertainty.  Will he get a job?  Where will it be?  Will we have to move house?  Will it pay as much as he gets now?  How will we survive if it doesn’t?   Will I be able to supplement our income doing what I love to do?  Will I have to get a ‘normal’ job?  What happens if he doesn’t find a job? If we move will I find friends as good as the ones I have here?  Will I be lonely?  Will I miss this place?  And on and on.

It’s the middle of the night, and I’ve been lying awake pondering these and other questions. And then it struck me that uncertainty is what makes photography so rewarding and so much fun.  When I go out with my camera I have no idea what I’m going to find, or if I’ll come back with any decent shots, and that’s exciting.  I set out with an open mind, a large dose of curiosity, and the assumption that I’m going to have a good time finding out.  Sometimes I’m disappointed with what I shoot and delete most of it, but I’ve still gained a lot from the process, and I simply allow myself to feel the disappointment for a moment and then move on.

More often, I find something unexpected – a shot that turned out far better than I could have hoped, or something that looks completely different – and better – in the photograph than it did in reality.  I come back with treasures.  Going out on a photography session is an adventure – I don’t know what will happen and that’s exactly what I like.  Imagine if you knew beforehand what shots you’d take, what they’d be of, how they’d turn out.  Dull, isn’t it?

I want to approach the rest of my life like this. I want to treat it as an exciting adventure instead of a worrying unknown.  I want to approach it with curiosity and an open mind.  I want to discard the bad bits without regret and move on to what’s next.  I want to get excited over the unexpected.  I want to find treasures I didn’t anticipate.

“Faith means living with uncertainty – feeling your way through life, letting your heart guide you like a lantern in the dark.
Dan Millman

There’s always more to a place than first meets the eye

It’s always tempting to think that what you need for inspiration, photographically, is to visit some exciting new place and it’s true that being somewhere new and different can give you a real creative boost.  But if you look at many famous photographers, you find that their best shots were often taken very close to home.  For example, Ansel Adams lived near Yosemite and visited it again and again; Edward Weston lived near Point Lobos and did the same.  Painters, too, often paint the same thing over and over – think of Monet with his lilypond, haystacks and Rouen Cathedral.

Going back time and again to the same places enables you to fully explore them and your own reaction to them.  I first noticed this when I did a course assignment on Canterbury Cathedral.  I had to make several visits to get enough material for the assignment, but even when it was finished I kept going back.  Each time I went there, I saw different things, and my seeing became more nuanced and subtle.  The kind of photographs I took there began to change, and began to express better how I felt about the place.  That’s not to say that these were the photographs that everybody else liked best, but they were the ones that made me feel I’d done what I wanted to do – which, let’s face it, is what’s important in the long run.

But cathedrals are a bit of a visual feast anyway, and what do you do when you’re going back to places that don’t inspire you that much in the first place?  I often feel the need to get out of the house and away from the computer, but I’m very limited in where I can walk to without getting in the car first.  My usual walk takes me up a country lane and back through the orchards, which sounds nice but there isn’t a lot there that’s particularly inspiring.  The last time I took my camera with me, for some reason my eyes seemed wider open to the possibilities and these shots were the result.  It did help that someone had been playing with the apples and plums!

Apples and plums

Apples and plums

Applies and plums on fence

This one’s a little bit macabre, but on the way there I spotted this headless doll lying on the other side of the fence and it reminded me of a crime scene.  I shot the whole body at first, but then I thought that just having the hands reaching out for something said a lot more.  Not my jolliest of shots, but I like them in their own way and feel they say something.

Crime scene

Crime scene - reaching

The wheatfield looked wonderful, but at first I couldn’t figure out how to get a shot that made it look the way I felt when I saw it.  There were some narrow tracks through it and I thought I’d try to use one of those to lead the eye through the image.  When I got home and put it up on the computer screen, it just didn’t give the effect I wanted.  The path didn’t stand out enough because there wasn’t enough contrast, but when I increased the contrast the wheat looked harsh and hard-edged.  I wanted to get the feeling of softness and abundance that I was experiencing.  After a bit of experimenting, I tried the Orton technique on it and got what I wanted.  It emphasised the path enough to show it up, and added to the soft feel that I was trying for.

Path through the wheat field

And then on the way home, I spotted these flowers and petals which had fallen from an overhanging tree onto the concrete path.  I thought the colours were lovely – this is probably my favourite shot of the day and I like the way it looks a bit painterly without me having done anything much to it to make it that way.  I’ve also realised that I have quite a few images of fallen petals, flowers and leaves, and I think I might try to add to this and develop it into a little personal project.

Fallen flowers