poetry is easier

Winter leaves with reflection

Why it’s easier to be a poet than a photographer:

  1.  It is not expected that you go somewhere exotic, grand, or far-flung in order to write a poem.  You can make one anywhere, about anything.  It will not be seen as a worse poem for being about your toddler looking at the moon (Ted Hughes), a fork in a woodland path (Robert Frost), a blade of grass (Brian Patten), or a haggis (Robert Burns). It is recognised that something big can be said by writing about something small.
  2. A poem is not thought to be better because you climbed a mountain and trekked through thigh-deep snow for hours in order to write it, nor because you had to get up before dawn or risk your life on the edge of a slippery precipice.  It is not thought better because you hefted several kilos of pens and notepads to the location where you wrote it.
  3. It is not necessary to keep upgrading your pen and paper to be any good.  Nobody will think any the less of you, nor judge your poems according to whether you write them with a biro or a Parker pen.
  4. Nobody ever asks what kind of poet you are and expects you to define yourself as a landscape poet, or a street poet, or to say you specialise in sonnets or villanelles.  It is enough to say that you write poetry.
  5.  A poem is not thought to be good because its grammar is exact and perfect, and its spelling exemplary.  A good poem breaks as many rules as it keeps and it needn’t be instantly clear and obvious.  It is recognised that there are many ways of creating a good poem and that all good poems do not have to conform to a single ideal, but are allowed to be good in their own way.
  6. A poem is not expected to describe exactly, but to distill its subject down to its essence and, by changing it, show it as it is.
  7. It is expected that a poem be edited and polished before it is released.  It is not regarded as some sort of cheating if you change the words of the first draft and crop out superfluous phrases.
  8. Finally, nobody ever says: ‘that’s a great poem, you must have a really good pen.  Oh, and what sort of notepad do you use?’

 

 

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