52 trees – week thirty-eight

Another shot from Sconce and Devon park.  Obviously, it’s a reflection, but I’ve turned it topsy-turvy to give it a slightly disconcerting, slightly surreal, feel.  I never can resist a good reflection and I never get tired of them – I doubt I ever will.

This set me wondering why so many of us like water reflections so much.  I did a bit of Googling, with the first result being an academic paper which came to the conclusion that people like reflections in water better than they do in glass, and they like reflective water better than they do clear water, and so it’s probably a good idea to incorporate ponds into garden design.  That really didn’t help much.

Maybe I wasn’t using the best search terms, but I couldn’t find anything much on this topic at all.  There was quite a lot on mirrors and their symbolism, and lots of stuff on the symbolism of water, but nothing on the psychology of why we’re drawn to reflections in water.  Even John Suler’s online book Photographic Psychology: Image and Psyche, which is my go-to place for this sort of thing, had very little to say on the subject.  However, he did point out that reflections in water span the boundaries between what our brain recognises as real or unreal – perhaps there’s some kind of attraction in that liminal space: a dreaminess, an other-worldliness.  It seems strange to me that so little is known about something so widespread.

 

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